Out of the leftovers

I’ve been collecting a lot of fingering and sock yarns over the past couple of years. It’s probably about 2 pounds worth – all beautiful and lovely yarn, most of which, on its own, is not enough to complete a project.

So, over the past few months I’ve been examining different patterns to use up this yarn. There’s the sock yarn blanket, and the beekeeper’s quilt – aka, the hexipuff throw. But I really didn’t have the mojo to do something that big. One runner-up was Paula Emons-Fuessle’s Magic Cake Ruffle shawl – I still may make one!

Then I saw the Scrappy Bias Shawl,¬†¬†which is a basic garter present shawl, with the idea of using up scraps, and I went through the big bag of scraps and got about 300 grams of scraps together, knowing I’d use somewhere between 170-200 grams. This is the pile:


Color choices

It’s mostly greens and blues, but I specifically included some other colors for pizzazz – yellows, gold, orange. When I took a color class at Stitches a couple of years ago, a couple of the lessons I learned were that the colors that catch your eye need to be in smaller proportion than the other colors – so I should use more of the mid-range colors than the hot or especially light or dark ones. The other tip was to put in a couple of very unexpected colors – colors that might not appear to go — and will add life to the scarf.

I also made the decision to use repetition along with the unexpected colors. I had a lot of the kelly-green color at the top, so I decided to use that more than once, along with some others, to give the shawl more coherence.

The blue stripe below shows an unexpected difference in the middle of the shawl, and the narrow stripes of orange give another pop.

Of what will we be makers?

When I was up at Zephyr Point, I did a message on knitting and ministry, and used the leftover pile as an example of how we often view folks in the congregation. But with a little help and seeing more deeply, things that seem useless and ready to throw away can actually turn into something beautiful:

There were audible gasps as I had been wearing the shawl, and took it off to show them how it had come about.

This is what makers do – we take ordinary things of the world, things that other people don’t see as valuable, and make them into a beautiful creation. It’s what God does too – people who think their life is over because of mistakes discover that a gracious God and communities who follow her find that out of the ashes, something new can happen.

This shawl I love because of how it came to be – it has a story. And these kinds of stories are worth sharing.

What stories does your knitting tell?

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