The Dye Runneth Over

I like to recycle things, and recycling yarn is really great.

A friend gave me a partially completed sweater that didn’t have the pattern. The cotton wasn’t very nice, especially for a garment, so I threw away the unfinished pieces (yes, I regret that now that I know you can re-condition yarn), and kept the rest.

The yarn made an appearance on the blog when I used it to learn the basket weave pattern for the Hanami stole. So I decided to knit another side and make it into a market bag.

Cute, huh?

Marketbasket1

All went well ’til the blocking, when this seemingly undyed cotton showed that the dye had not set at all. Really. The dye kept coming out. I tried adding vinegar, but it didn’t really help all that much. You can see the dye running on the handle.

Marketbasket2

I am glad that this won’t need to be washed very often!

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Lace Edges – cool!

I decided to teach a class about lace edging. This was a bit of hubris, because I hadn’t knit anything but bottom up lace edgings like this:

ArborLace1

So, I’ve had a lot of fun learning the principles of perpendicular knitted lace edges. Great for baby blankets:

trefoillace2

And equally terrific for bamboo and silk scarves:

IMG_1200

We’ll see how it goes tomorrow.

In other news, I submitted two items to the Marin County Fair — one is the Hanami stole, the other is an item that I designed, and since I’m still thinking of submitting it for publication, I cannot blog about it. 🙁

Remember, WWKIP is tomorrow. I’ll be at Marin Fiber Arts (where the scaffolding in front of the store might actually be a helpful thing finally) Find a public place and knit!

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All About the Beads

Back when I did the Hanami stole, it was my first foray into bead knitting. I realize that starting to use beads on lace yarn like this is not the usual way to do it, but that’s me. Fortunately, it wasn’t a lot of beads!

Then, when I was listening to Ivy’s Knit Spirit podcast, I noticed that Earthfaire was a sponsor.

So I checked out the website, and couldn’t resist buying this kit — I find that kits are really, really helpful when I’m learning something new. This kit, shown here:

Fire Polish Crystals

is very complete, has very lovely crystal beads, all the materials (except the size 0 needles), and even came with a sterling silver clasp for the bracelet!

Fire Polish Crystal bracelet

So, given that there is a bead store a block away from Marin Fiber Arts, I think I may be doing some more bead knitting!

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Rocking the Socks

I’ve been knitting socks for about 6 years. As with a lot of people, I was always intimidated by the tiny needles (although my first sweater was on size 1 and 2 needles!), the double points (I didn’t know about bamboo and wood) and the term “turning the heel.” In my mind, I imagined that knitting gymnastics were required, and decided that they were not for me.

The first ones I knit were actually baby booties in some DK weight. Then at Stitches I bought “The Purl Stitch” by Sally Melville which had a simple sock pattern and I stumbled into a booth with Mountain Colors and knit some great socks, although on too large needles. and they were easy, so then I branched out and got Folk Socks by Nancy Bush, and Cool Socks, Warm Feet by Lucy Neatby. Warren at Marin Fiber Arts has a great selection of sock yarn, including the amazing Pagewood Farm yarns.

But until a month ago, I had not used Blue Moon Fiber Arts “Socks That Rock.” When visiting my friend Liz, we went to Purlescence Yarns, and I bought a skein in “Pebble Beach” which really does look like that beautiful part of the Monterey peninsula.

I knit. Yes, it was verrry, nice. I love the twist, the squishiness, the way it makes my knitting look great without any tugging. So here they are:

STR1b

and a lovely turned heel:

STR1c

I am happy sock person!

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